Foundation Fellowship for Edwin Mok

25th October 2017

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Alumnus and benefactor Edwin Mok (Law, 1979) has been elected to a Foundation Fellowship at Wadham. 

  • The Warden, Ken Macdonald QC presents Edwin Mok with his Foundation Fellowship certificate, with Director of Development, Julie Hage and Emeritus Fellow, Jeffrey Hackney.

  • Edwin Mok with family members

Edwin, a Hong Kong based solicitor, was the first of one hundred Lee Shau Kee Scholars who came to Wadham from Hong Kong over a 28-year period.

A student of Emeritus Fellow Jeffrey Hackney, Edwin has been a long-time supporter of the College, making regular visits to Wadham and frequently hosting alumni events in Hong Kong.

He was one of the major benefactors to the McCall MacBain Graduate Centre, supporting the Dr Mok Hing Yiu Reading Room, named in his father’s honour; he has also supported the Jeffrey Hackney Law Fellowship, the LSK Scholars’ Seminar Room and, most recently, the endowed Mok Medical Scholarship. An avid art collector, Edwin donated several pieces from his textile collection to an auction supporting the University of Oxford China Centre.

Warden of Wadham College, Ken Macdonald QC commented: “We are delighted to formally recognise Edwin Mok’s enormous generosity to Wadham through his election to our Foundation Fellowship. Edwin is a great friend of the College and we look forward to continuing to work closely with him over forthcoming years.”

The Foundation Fellow ceremony took place in Wadham's McCall MacBain Graduate Centre on Monday 23 October in the presence of the Warden, Emeritus Fellow Jeffrey Hackney and distinguished guests.

The pioneering Lee Shau Kee scholarship programme ran from 1979 to 2006. Funded by Dr Lee Shau Kee, it allowed Hong Kong’s most talented students to pursue an undergraduate degree at Oxford, thus widening access to Oxford for talented students regardless of their financial means and background.  For a generation, the scholarships were an aspiration for the city’s top academic achievers and encouraged countless students to consider an Oxford education.