Search

Select a category:

Mark Thompson

Dr Mark Thompson, Associate Professor in Engineering Science,
Tutor in Engineering

MEng (PhD Lond) CEng

Department of Engineering Science

  • Mark Thompson

It’s fantastic being a lecturer in engineering science and a tutorial fellow at Wadham. I am privileged to interact with some of the brightest young engineering minds around and to follow their development over their years of study at the College.

Mark Thompson

Dr Mark Thompson

Dr Mark Thompson is Associate Professor in Engineering Science and Tutor in Engineering at Wadham College.

Contact Mark Engineering at Wadham

Mark Thompson studied engineering at Magdalen, Oxford, and obtained his PhD in biomechanics from the University of London. He was an EC Marie Curie Fellow at the University of Lund, Sweden for two years, and an AO Research Fellow and leader of the mechanobiology group at the Charité Hospital in Berlin, Germany for three years, before returning in 2006 to take up his "dream job here in Oxford."

Mark leads the Oxford Mechanobiology Group, based at the Botnar Research Centre on the site of the Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre in Headington. Their research concerns the application of mechanical analysis to clinically significant problems of tissue function and physiology. You can read more about this here.

At the undergraduate level Mark teaches various aspects of mechanics including lectures on Biomechanics as a third year option and Mechanobiology as a fourth year option. In tutorials he covers core courses on structures, mechanics and materials, as well as some mathematics.

Mark has two administrative roles concerned with graduates at the University: at Wadham College he is Tutor for Graduates, while at the Department of Engineering Science he will be Associate Head (Graduates) from September 2017.

Mark is a keen off-road runner and mountaineer, and, when time, allows enjoys singing and playing his bassoon. He enjoys learning languages, and especially keeping his German, Swedish and Russian from becoming too rusty.