Feminist protest in pictures

1st March 2019

News, Student news

As an exhibition of photographs, documenting the history of the Mexican feminist movement, opens in Wadham antechapel, we meet student curator Monica Lindsay-Perez.

  • Ana Victoria JimĂ©nez, Abortion Protest (1991), A.V.J. Archive Iberoamericana University

    Ana Victoria Jiménez, Abortion Protest (1991), A.V.J. Archive Iberoamericana University

  • Ana Victoria Jiménez, Abortion Protest (1991), A.V.J. Archive Iberoamericana University

The photography of Ana Victoria Jiménez, 1964-1990, tells the story of Mexican feminism through protest photographs from the 1970s.

Monica (Mst Women’s Studies, 2018) came across Jiménez’s work when studying at Harvard but it was on a trip to Mexico in 2018 that she visited the Universidad Iberoamericana and discovered the archive of her photographs. In January this year she had the opportunity to interview Jiménez, now 85. 

“She does not consider herself to be a photo-journalist; she felt that the women’s protest movement was beautiful. She now spends much of her time cataloguing her work and collecting images and texts relevant to the feminist movement in Mexico. She told me that she felt everyone should document the experiences which they live,” said Monica 

Jiménez was one of the founding members of the National Union of Mexican Women in 1964, and went on to attend and photograph many of the most important feminist and working-class protests in Mexico City from 1964-1990, including the Mother's Day protest (1971), the Miss Universe protest (1978) and the abortion protests of the 90s.

This exhibition traces her career and marks the 40th anniversary of the International Dinner Party (1979). For 24 hours, women across the world dined together in international feminist solidarity, sending photographs and telegraphs to American feminist artist, Suzanne Lacy, who pinned red flags on an international feminist map. Ana Victoria Jiménez organised the Mexican Dinner Party.

“The work of Ana Victoria Jiménez makes up one of the largest feminist archives in the world and this exhibition seeks to expand the focus of feminist exhibitions in the UK,” concludes Monica. 

Monica is a student at Magdalen College but her studies are mostly based at Wadham with tutors Jane Garnett and Claudia Pazos-Alonso. 

The exhibition is open from March 1-28, with opening times available here.

This event is sponsored by the Mexican Embassy, the British Mexican Society, the National University of Mexico, the Oxford Latin American Centre, the Women in the Humanities Research Centre, the Iberoamericana University, the Oxford Sub-Faculty of Spanish, Wadham College, and the Oxford Mexican Society.

  • Monica Lindsay-Perez

About Ana Victoria Jiménez

Ana Victoria Jiménez was born in Mexico City in 1941. In the early 1960s she studied graphic arts at the Union of Linotype Press Workers (El Sindicato de los Artistas Gráficos) and began to earn a living as a typesetter in a print shop. 

It was not until 1974 that she was able to study photography at a technical college at night. Alongside her career in the graphics industry, Ana Victoria Jiménez became interested in feminist issues because of her participation in the Communist Youth League of

Mexico City. By 1964, Ana Victoria Jiménez had become one of the founding members of the National Union of Mexican Women (Unión Nacional de Mujeres Mexicanas) (UNMM) and went on to participate in many of the most important feminist movements, collectives, and protests in Mexico City between 1964-1990. More (in Spanish on Wikipedia)

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