Wadham welcomes Honorary Fellows

19th November 2020

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We are delighted to announce the appointment of two Honorary Fellows, Paul Goodwin and Verena Knaus.

  • Paul Goodwin

    Paul Goodwin in his office at Chelsea College of Arts, by Sabrina Mumtaz Hasan

  • Paul Goodwin

Paul Goodwin (DPhil, Geography and the Environment, 1992) is an independent curator, researcher, educator and urban theorist based in London. His curatorial, research and writing projects extend across the interdisciplinary fields of contemporary art, migration, urbanism and curatorial studies with a focus on African diaspora art and visual cultures. 

Verena Knaus (History, 1995) is Global Chief, Migration and Displacement at UNICEF. Verena provides support and guidance to UNICEF country offices globally on policy and programmes for refugee and migrant children. Verena also leads on UNICEF’s global engagement with the Global Migration and Refugee Compacts, working in partnership with civil society organization, UN agencies and other stakeholders.

Paul Goodwin

Paul Goodwin (DPhil, Geography and the Environment, 1992) is an independent curator, researcher, educator and urban theorist based in London. His curatorial, research and writing projects extend across the interdisciplinary fields of contemporary art, migration, urbanism and curatorial studies with a focus on African diaspora art and visual cultures. He is currently Professor of Contemporary Art and Urbanism and Director of TrAIN (Research Centre for Transnational Art, Identity and Nation) at the University of the Arts London. Goodwin is best known for his important contributions to telling and showing the untold stories of the innovations of Black British artists who have been under-represented in the history of British art, via exhibitions and cultural projects at major museums such as Tate.

In his interdisciplinary research project Revisioning Black Urbanism from 2006 to 2010 he  investigated topics relating to urbanism, urban protests and the negotiation of black identities in cities such as London, Lisbon and Paris.  As a curator at Tate Britain from 2007-2012 he directed Tate Britain’s pioneering Cross Cultural Programme, a multi-disciplinary curatorial and programming platform that explored the impact of globalisation on contemporary art in Britain. 
 
His curatorial projects include a number of internationally significant exhibitions including: Migrations: Journeys Into British Art, Tate Britain 2012; Thin Black Line(s), Tate Britain, 2011; Coming Ashore, 2011, Berardo Collection Museum in Lisbon, Portugal; Afro Modern: Journeys Through the Black Atlantic (consultant curator), Tate Liverpool, 2010; Underconstruction, Hospital Julius De Matos, Lisbon, Portugal, 2009. In 2013 he curated Charlie Phillips: The Urban Eye at New Art Exchange, Nottingham which was long-listed for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2014. 
 
Goodwin’s current research includes Worlding Public Cultures: The Arts and Social Innovation where he leads an International consortium of universities and museums including Carleton, Heidleberg and Amsterdam Universities and Tate Modern, Museum of World Cultures (Amsterdam) and National Gallery of Canada. Recent and upcoming curatorial projects include: W.E.B. DuBois: Charting Black Lives (House of Illustration, London, Nov. 2019 - March 2020), We Will Walk: Art and Resistance in the American South (Turner Contemporary, Margate, Nov 2019 – May 2020) and Untitled: Art on the Conditions of Our Time (Kettle's Yard, Cambridge,  Feb – April 2021).
 
Goodwin is curatorial director of the 3D Foundation international sculpture park and residency programme in Verbier, Switzerland, a trustee of The Africa Centre in London, A Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and an Honorary Member of the Franco-British Council.
 
His multidisciplinary research and curatorial practice revolve around exploring the creative potential of both cities and exhibitions as sites of aesthetic, socio-cultural and political intervention. Within the urban field this has been framed around understanding how the black and migrant presence in cities have shaped and in turn been shaped by formations of urban aesthetic and socio-cultural modernity. Within contemporary art, to which he came out of geography and urban studies, he has focused on how processes of migration, globalisation and transnationalism are yielding new forms of innovative artistic and curatorial practices that are challenging dominant modes racism, nationalism and the coloniality of power.

Verena Knaus

As Senior Migration Advisor working at UNICEF Headquarters in NY, Verena Knaus (History, 1995) provides support and guidance to UNICEF country offices globally on policy and programmes for refugee and migrant children. Verena also leads on UNICEF’s global engagement with the Global Migration and Refugee Compacts, working in partnership with civil society organization, UN agencies and other stakeholders.

Prior to this, Verena spent five years as Senior Policy Advisor in the UNICEF EU office, where she focused on child rights mainstreaming across EU internal and external policies and programmes, scaling up and leveraging EU investments for children.
 
Before joining UNICEF, in the years 2010 and 2012, Verena authored three UNICEF reports on the experiences and impact of repatriation and returns on vulnerable children, including on their psycho-social health. From 2008 – 2012, Verena provided strategic advice to the Kosovo Ministry of European Integration and the mayor of the ethnically divided city of Mitrovica, focusing on the rule of law, visa liberalization, local economic development and interethnic reconciliation.
 
From 1999-2008, as co-founder and Senior Analyst for the European Stability Initiative (ESI), an independent policy think tank, Verena coordinated ESI’s research and campaigns in Turkey and the Balkans. There, she spearheaded empirical research and policy campaigns on issues ranging from women’s rights to visa liberalization, political Islam and post-war recovery. She helped develop ESI’s unique methodology, combining labour-intensive data collection with real-time, policy-oriented advocacy. Knaus has combined her research and policy work with a role as strategy advisor, and has been imaginative in deploying different media to effect political education and transformation. From 2008-2009 she advised the former prime minister and mayor of the divided city of Mitrovica, and in summer 2010 she joined Kosovo’s Ministry for European Integration as a strategy advisor focusing on the rule of law, local economic development and inter-ethnic reconciliation. In 2008, she helped produce the award-winning documentary film series ‘Balkan Express: Return to Europe’, seen by more than 2 million viewers. Verena is also co-author of the first English-language guidebook on Kosovo (Bradt Guide), Yale World Fellow and Young Global Leader of the World Economic Forum.
 
  • Verena Knaus